fbpx
breast-cancer-mother-daughter

Breast cancer through a mother’s eyes

“Why? Why my daughter and not me?”

That was the first thought that came to Lauri Cain’s mind when she heard the news. Her 31-year-old daughter Megan has breast cancer.

The rush of emotions that engulfed her were overwhelming. First, it was shock — Megan was young, healthy and full of life. Of all people, how could she have breast cancer?

Then came the fear.

But Lauri knew she needed to be strong for Megan, her only child. She soon began to cope with the pain and focus on what came next — beating this thing.

Fortunately, Megan had acted quickly when she found a strange lump in her breast one day. Sure, she was only 31, but she and Lauri wondered, could this be breast cancer?

They weren’t taking any chances.

“Explore."

“Nurse navigators play an important role in guiding a patient and their family through the process,” Lauri said. “There were so many unknowns in the beginning, and they have helped us all along the way thus far.”

After breast imaging, Megan was diagnosed with ductal carcinoma, a common form of breast cancer that starts in the milk ducts. Working with her physician, Valerie Gorman, MD, chief of surgery at Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Waxahachie, Megan quickly started on a comprehensive treatment plan that involves chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and breast reconstruction.

Preparing for the unknown is a difficult task, but Lauri said they have found support and encouragement through nurse navigators. A nurse or patient navigator serves as your partner in navigating the multifaceted road of cancer care. Navigators work individually with patients and families to provide a personalized approach and support throughout all phases of the cancer journey.

“Nurse navigators play an important role in guiding a patient and their family through the process,” Lauri said. “There were so many unknowns in the beginning, and they have helped us all along the way thus far.”

Related: How nurse and patient navigators make your cancer journey easier

They’ve also learned to trust and embrace the support of Megan’s physicians.

“The physicians and nurses at the imaging center and at the Sammons Cancer Center at Baylor University Medical Center and Baylor Scott & White Medical Center – Waxahachie have been very reassuring to us from the start, explaining to us how breast cancer treatment has come so far in recent years and is treatable,” Lauri said. “The amazing doctors identified the right treatment plan tailored specifically for Megan.”

With a comprehensive treatment plan laid out before them and the support of Megan’s care team, they felt confident taking the next steps in Megan’s breast cancer journey. Now almost finished with her chemotherapy treatments, Megan continues to stay strong and positive.

“She is focused on becoming a cancer-free survivor,” Lauri said.

“We have always been a close-knit family, but I would say this experience has caused us to slow down a little bit and take time to truly take care of ourselves, and of each other.”

Lauri said this breast cancer journey has already brought their family closer, as they’ve realized they need each other now more than ever. Through their strong faith, they are able to get through this tough journey together, knowing they are not alone.

Related: “Your wife has breast cancer”: 5 words that changed my life

“Our faith is strong and we have the support of our church and many Christian friends who are praying for Megan and our family,” she said. “We have always been a close-knit family, but I would say this experience has caused us to slow down a little bit and take time to truly take care of ourselves, and of each other.”

Lauri said their family is determined to stay optimistic through every phase — and so far for Megan, that’s been no problem. Lauri could not be prouder of her daughter’s strength and resilience in dealing with this diagnosis and the side effects that have come with chemotherapy. As hard as it is for Lauri to watch her daughter face this disease, Megan is lucky to have her mom as her biggest cheerleader. She may be an adult but to Lauri, she will always be her little girl.

“As all parents know, adult sons and daughters will always be our children, regardless of age,” Lauri said.

Mammograms have the power to save lives. Stop procrastinating and get your mammogram today

About the author

Matthew Olivolo
More articles

Matthew Olivolo is a senior marketing and public relations consultant for Baylor Scott & White Health. He is a former U.S. Marine journalist and communications professional. When he isn’t writing, he competes in Ironman triathlon races across the country.

Leave a Reply

Breast cancer through a mother’s eyes