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Keep Fitness Simple and Stop Spinning Your Wheels

spinning-your-wheels

You go to the gym religiously and do 60 minutes on the elliptical or take a leisurely spin on the recumbent bike as you read the latest gossip in People Magazine. What about when you go to your favorite strength training class, grab your five pound weights and squat and curl away?

Are you getting any results? No.

So then you think about your nutrition, “Obviously, I’m eating too much,” you say to yourself. You drastically cut your calorie intake. A meal replacement shake for breakfast, a half sandwich for lunch with a diet soda, and then a salad with a few slivers of chicken for dinner and maybe a glass of wine.

Are you getting any results? No.

I need to exercise more! I need to eat less! I’m not getting any results! It’s my thyroid! It’s my hormones! I need HCG! Are you getting any results? No.

Stop spinning your wheels and reevaluate. To paraphrase strength coach Mike Boyle, stop the long, slow walk to nowhere.

Boyle says when it comes to training and nutrition, follow the 180-degree rule. Whatever you see everybody else doing, you should do the complete opposite.

The  U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) says to focus on whole grains, you focus on protein and green leafy vegetables. The fitness magazines say to do goofy stunt exercises, you deadlift. Everyone else is walking on the treadmill, you up your speed and/or your incline (no holding on allowed!). The other women stick to the machines, you grab some dumbbells.

Keep it simple: Eat clean, lift heavy and run fast!

About the author

Katie Brumley
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Katie is the Strength & Conditioning Coordinator at the Baylor Tom Landry Fitness Center in Dallas, Texas and a certified personal trainer through the National Strength & Conditioning Association.

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Keep Fitness Simple and Stop Spinning Your Wheels