Businesses, Not the Government, Still Steer Health Care Innovation

During World War II, federally imposed controls prohibited employers from raising wages to attract workers, but the War Labor Board at that time decided that “fringe” benefits, such as health insurance, didn’t count as wages. And that was the rise of employer-sponsored health insurance as we know it today—a way for companies to differentiate themselves … Continue reading Businesses, Not the Government, Still Steer Health Care Innovation

Why Does the U.S. Spend More On Healthcare Than Other Countries?

This blog post is the third in the Supply, Demand and Medicine series on health care reform. That question (or some variation of it) is something that my colleagues and I across the healthcare industry are asked all the time. It’s also something that we spend a lot of time studying.   I wish the answer simply was … Continue reading Why Does the U.S. Spend More On Healthcare Than Other Countries?

What’s the Cost of Not Incentivizing Preventative Care?

When 50-year-old Michael Kelly recently ended up in a Dallas emergency room, he was told his diabetes was out of control and was now threatening his life. He already knew he was diabetic—he was actually diagnosed 10 years earlier, but he says he simply wasn’t eating right or taking care of himself and didn’t realize … Continue reading What’s the Cost of Not Incentivizing Preventative Care?